Cross-curricular content, connection to English grammar give Battlefield Latin students an edge.
Posted on 05/02/2017
picture of Roman aqueduct

Scores have come in for the National Latin Exam, and Battlefield High School students excelled, as did students taking Latin through Virtual High School @ PWCS.

Latin is alive and thriving at Battlefield High School under the expert guidance of teachers Kendra Yount and Ashley Walsh. Typically, 170 students enroll in courses ranging from Latin 1 through Latin 5, and Pre-Advanced Placement 3 and Pre-Advanced Placement 4.

Congratulations to the following students:

Battlefield - Purple Ribbon Outstanding Achievement Award (Introduction to Latin)

  • Derek Deutsch
  • Michael Carter
  • Kaylee Le
  • Camille Owen

Battlefield - Achievement Award (Introduction to Latin)

  • Michael Haddadin
  • Spruha Rami
  • Jacob Schaum
  • Jack Rickwalder
  • Ian Lee
  • Samantha Tolar
  • Luke Ridder

Battlefield - Gold Medal Summa Cum Laude Award (All other levels of the exam)

  • Kavya Annapareddy
  • Isaiah Sanchez-Perry

 Battlefield - Magna Cum Laude Award

  • Ian Mischel

Battlefield - Cum Laude Award

  • Noah Miller
  • Brandon Ivanov

Virtual High School @ PWCS (Ashley Walsh, Latin teacher)

  • Grace Cha (Lake Ridge MS) –Magna Cum Laude
  • Ian Draughon (Forest Park) received a silver medal (Maxima Cum Laude award)
  • Jack Padberg (Forest Park) – Cum Laude

Picture of five Battlefield HS students“Latin is definitely alive in our vocabulary,” said Yount. “Some studies show that between 60-80 percent of our vocabulary comes from Latin roots.” She teaches new grammatical concepts in English before showing the same concept in Latin, a strategy that her students love.

“Students really improve their English grammar and syntax.  Often they will be the only ones in their English classes who know what gerunds are or when to correctly use "who" versus "whom," Yount added.

“Even though we are a language class, we touch on history, art, government, politics, architecture, and literature, and many other topics which are also taught in other courses. The students really enjoy all the cross-curricular connections that we make and it gives them a chance to shine in their other classes when they know something that other students have not yet learned,” said Yount.